Research on Disability

Research on
Disability


Home > News-Features

 


New Publication: More likely to be poor whatever the measure: Working-age persons with disabilities in the United States

by User Not Found | Jul 02, 2014

More likely to be poor whatever the measure: Working-age persons with disabilities in the United States

Debra L. Brucker, University of New Hampshire Sophie Mitra, Fordham University Navena Chaitoo, Fordham University Joseph Mauro, Fordham University

Abstract:

Objective. This article examines whether disability is a correlate of poverty when poverty is measured using (1) the official poverty measure; (2) the supplemental poverty measure (SPM); and (3) two multidimensional poverty measures created by the authors. Methods. Data from the Current Population Survey are used to explore the relationship between poverty and disability for each measure. Differences across disability status were tested for statistical significance. Results. Disability is associated with poverty, irrespective of the poverty measure under use. The gap in poverty rates between persons with and without disabilities is smaller when using the SPM as compared to the official poverty measure. The gap in poverty rates between persons with and without disabilities is highest when using multidimensional poverty measures. Conclusion. Working-age persons with disabilities are more likely to be poor whatever the measure under use. They are a disadvantaged group in the United States.

Social Science Quarterly, DOI: 10.1111/ssqu.12098 

You are not allowed to post comments.