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New Publication: How Do Working-Age People With Disabilities Spend Their Time?

by User Not Found | Oct 23, 2014
How Do Working-Age People With Disabilities Spend Their Time? New Evidence From the American Time Use Survey

Priyanka Anand, Yonatan Ben-Shalom

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Abstract
We use the American Time Use Survey to examine the extent to which adults with disabilities—defined using both the new six-question sequence on disability and the traditional work-limitation question—spend more time on health-related activities and less time on other activities than those without disabilities. We find that men and women who both reported a work limitation and responded “yes” to any of the questions in the six-question disability sequence spend approximately 40 to 50 more minutes per week, respectively, on health-related activities. We also find that most working-age men and women who report a disability work fewer hours per day than men and women without disabilities. The largest difference is for men and women who report both types of disability; these individuals spend, on average, 5 fewer hours per day in paid work than men and women without disabilities. On average, most of the decrease in paid work time is offset by more time spent on leisure activities (defined as activities that provide direct utility, such as entertainment, social activities, attending recreational events, and general relaxation) and sleeping, which is likely due to these being default activities for individuals whose medical issues and environment constrain them from participating in other activities.

The StatsRRTC is funded by the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research under cooperative agreement H133B080012, from 2008 - 2013. The information developed by the StatsRRTC does not necessarily represent the policy of the Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government (Edgar, 75.620 (b)). 

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